fbpx

World Stroke Day 2019

Over our lifetimes, 1 in 4 of us will suffer a stroke. Strokes can happen with no previous medical history and without warning – on top of that, they can happen to anyone, anywhere. That’s why for World Stroke Day 2019, the World Stroke Organisation are asking that you #DontBeTheOne, with this year’s campaign focusing on the importance of prevention.

Stroke is a leading cause of disability worldwide, as well as causing over five million deaths per year. While over 80% of people can survive a stroke, survivors may have difficulties with communication, living independently, physical activity and more – which is why it’s so important to work towards living a healthy life that can help reduce the risk of stroke.

On the 29th October, World Stroke Day 2019 is the perfect opportunity to demonstrate ways in which lifestyle changes can help prevent stroke so you or your loved one #DontBeTheOne. You can reduce many of the risk factors of stroke greatly, helping prevent stroke and ensure that you and your loved ones can live the fullest, healthiest lives possible.

Look at ways you can raise awareness of the #DontBeTheOne campaign and show how easy it is to reduce the risk of stroke through simple lifestyle changes. Start off by accessing the Stroke Riskometer. This app (available on iOS and Android) is designed to assess your risk of stroke through 20 scientific questions. The app can give you an approximate risk of the likelihood of stroke over the next 5 to 10 years, as well as provide essential information about how to reduce your risk of stroke and improve your health. Developed with the help of medical professionals, as well as being highly rated and recommended by doctors, the Stroke Riskometer is an easy way to quickly and accurately get an idea of your overall health and take the first step towards prevention.

Some of the key factors that can increase your risk of stroke include: smoking, being overweight, eating a poor diet – especially one high in salt – and drinking excessive amounts of alcohol. Luckily these are manageable changes and there are healthcare services you can access to get help with these changes. Speak to your doctor if you’re interested in living a healthier life and reducing your risk of stroke – or let your patients know these services are free and available to them.

Many people are familiar with the FAST Campaign for stroke awareness (Face, Arms, Speech, Time as the critical factors for recognising a stroke). Why not run a series of workshops for your local after school club to teach children how to be FAST Heroes and learn some basic first aid? There are plenty of ways you can get involved to help raise awareness this World Stroke Day – check out the resources pack.

Get involved on the 29th October by showing people how easy it is to live a healthier life with a reduced risk of stroke. Encourage them to download the Stroke Riskometer and start taking steps to make sure they #DontBeTheOne.